Santa’s Elves: What exactly are they in reality Part 7

Christmas: Is it Christian or Pagan? – Part 7
Santa’s Elves: What exactly are they in reality?

2nd Corinthians 11:14 “And no marvel; for Satan himself is transformed into an angel of light.”

Jon Watkins  Online Ministries  November 2015
Cynthia Pawl edited, corrected and added to this!

Ahhh those jolly old elves that work in Santa’s workshop making all those toys for good little girls and boys. (except for Herbie who became a dentist in Rudolf the red-nosed reindeer) As with all things related to Christmas, Elves have a pagan root and are NOT what is depicted in popular Christmas shows.

An elf (plural: elves) is a type of supernatural being in Germanic mythology and folklore. Reconstructing the early concept of an elf depends almost entirely on texts in Old English or relating to Norse mythology. Later evidence for elves appears in diverse sources such as medical texts, prayers, ballads, and folktales. Recent scholars have emphasized, in the words of Ármann Jakobsson, that the time has come to resist reviewing information about álfar en masse and trying to impose generalizations on a tradition of a thousand years. Legends of álfar may have been constantly changing and were perhaps always heterogeneous so it might be argued that any particular source will only reflect the state of affairs at one given time.
However, some generalizations are possible. In medieval Germanic-speaking cultures, elves seem generally to have been thought of as a group of beings with magical powers and supernatural beauty, ambivalent towards everyday people and capable of either helping or hindering them. However, the precise character of beliefs in elves across the Germanic-speaking world has varied considerably across time, space, and different cultures. In Old Norse mythological texts, elves seem at least at times to be counted among the pagan gods; in medieval German texts they seem more consistently monstrous and harmful.

Elves are prominently associated with sexual threats, seducing people and causing them harm. For example, a number of early modern ballads in the British Isles and Scandinavia, originating in the medieval period, describe human encounters with elves.

In English literature of the Elizabethan era, elves became conflated with the fairies of Romance culture, so that the two terms began to be used interchangeably. German Romanticist writers were influenced by this notion of the ‘elf’, and re-imported the English word elf in that context into the German language. In Scandinavia, probably through a process of euphemism, elves often came to be known as (or were conflated with) the beings called the huldra or huldufólk. Meanwhile, German folklore has tended to see the conflation of elves with dwarfs.

The “Christmas elves” of contemporary popular culture are of relatively recent tradition, popularized during the late nineteenth-century in the United States. Elves entered the twentieth-century high fantasy genre in the wake of works published by authors such as J. R. R. Tolkien, for which, see Elf (Middle-earth).
Source


Elves are derived from what is known as a Krampus!

Krampus is the dark companion of St. Nicholas, (note they say “dark companion” of Santa) the traditional European winter gift-bringer who rewards good children each year on December 6. The kindly old Saint leaves the task of punishing bad children to a hell-bound counterpart known by many names across the continent — Knecht Ruprecht, Certa, Perchten, Black Peter, Schmutzli, Pelznickel, Klaubauf, and Krampus. Usually seen as a classic devil with horns, cloven hooves and monstrous tongue, but can also be spotted as a sinister gentleman dressed in black, or a hairy man-beast. Krampus punishes the naughty children, swatting them with switches and rusty chains before dragging them, in baskets, to a fiery place below. Source.

See this November 22, 2016 article from the Sun.uk: Satanic celebrations erupt in Austria as hundreds turn out as terrifying Christmas demon Krampus! Now, what more proof do you need people?

What is the Krampusnacht Celebration?

December 5 is the evening on which parts of Germany and Bavaria celebrate Krampusnacht, which is a throwback to a pre-Christian tradition. The word Krampus means “claw”, and apparently certain Alpine villages have big parties featuring a scary clawed incubus who hangs around with Santa Claus. The Krampus costume also includes sheepskin, horns, and a switch that the incubus uses to swat children and unsuspecting young ladies.

The Krampus’ job is to punish those who have been bad, while Santa rewards the people on his “nice” list. There’s been a resurgence in interest in Krampus over the past century or so, but it seems as though the custom goes back hundreds of years.

While the men parade around dressed as creepy demons, the women get to have some fun too, wearing masks and representing Frau Perchta, who was a Nordic goddess, who may have been an aspect of Freyja, the fertility goddess. Interestingly, in the Pennsylvania Dutch community, there’s a character called Pelsnickel or Belznickel who is an awful lot like Krampus, so it appears that the tradition migrated across the water when Germans settled in America. There has been a recent surge of interest in these characters in the United States, with multiple cities honoring them with there own Krampus night parades and celebrations.

Krampus.com, which calls itself the official home of “Krampus, the holiday devil,” calls Krampus a “dark counterpart of Saint Nicholas, the traditional European gift-bringer who visits on his holy day of December 6th. The bishop-garbed St. Nicholas rewards good kids with gifts and treats; unlike the archetypal Santa, however, St. Nicholas never punishes naughty children, parceling out this task to a ghastly helper from below.” Source


A centuries-old Christmas tradition called the Krampus Run returns to Bavaria where monsters roam the streets in search of bad children. These are what Elves are based on! Elves are Lucifer in disguise folks!

Elf on a Shelf Stupidity that leads Children into Fantasy

Elf on a shelf was created by three woman, Carol Aebersold with daughters Christa Pitts and Chanda Bell. Just like occultist J.K. Rowling who created Harry Potter, their creation is leading millions of children into fantasy and possibly straight to Hell!

As the story goes, the elf keeps an eye on kid’s during the days and weeks leading up to Christmas Eve as a sort of spy for Santa Claus.

Some idiot parents might move the elf in strange positions around the home for kids to notice in the morning. If a child is indoctrinated into believing a jolly bearded man in a red suit can make millions of deliveries in one night in December, they will believe that a doll can come to life and move around the house! It’s no different then the lie of the tooth fairy or Peter Pan!

The dolls always have non-threatening names like Snowflake or Sweetie Pie to soften the blow of being spied on by a man who lives in the North Pole.

The Elf on the Shelf is prepping your Childs mind for the police state

Update November 14, 2016:
There was a Satanic ritual in the opening of the new Swiss Tunnel at the end of May 2016. The same characters used in Ritual are the same that represent Santa’s Elves! See this article with Videos:

Satanic ritual used to unveil Gotthard Train Tunnel in Switzerland.

Continued in Part 8Santa’s Magic Reindeer.