Soylent Green comes to reality in California Bill?

Not surprising that it would come from the kooks out of the Sodomy State! The CIA script writers were very active back in 1973!

For those who do not know what Soylent Green is:

Soylent Green is a 1973 American science fiction thriller film directed by Richard Fleischer and starring Charlton Heston […]

The 20th century’s industrialization led to overcrowding, pollution and global warming due to “the greenhouse effect.” In 2022, 40 million people live in New York City; housing is dilapidated; homeless people fill the streets; many are unemployed; those few with jobs are only barely scraping by and food and working technology are scarce with most of the population surviving on rations produced by the Soylent Corporation. Their latest product is Soylent Green, a green wafer advertised to contain “high-energy plankton” from the World Ocean, more nutritious and palatable than its predecessors “Red” and “Yellow” but in short supply.[…] Source: Wikipedia

At the end of the movie, once it is discovered what Soylent Green really is, “Thorn is taken away, shouting out: “Soylent Green is people!”

Want to Cut Your Carbon Footprint? Get Liquefied When You’re Dead

KQED ScienceYou may not equate death with climate change, but disposing of human remains leaves a fairly hefty carbon footprint.

Supporters of a California bill allowing dead bodies to be dissolved in a hot chemical bath are hoping to overcome the ‘ick factor.’

“Cremation is really what people hold up as the environmentally friendly option,” says Caitlin Doughty, a mortician in Los Angeles. “It’s better than the whole rigmarole of formaldehyde and chemicals and big caskets that go into the more traditional funeral industry, but it still releases mercury into the air, and it uses a whole ton of natural gas.”

Plus, Doughty says, cemeteries monopolize land, an increasingly precious resource as the population grows.

Hence the growing popularity of a green alternative, known as water cremation, bio-cremation or flameless cremation. Basically, the body is dissolved in a hot chemical bath, leaving a sterile solution that can be flushed down the drain. The carbon footprint of this process is just a quarter of traditional fire cremation because it uses so much less energy; and only a sixth of a burial because it doesn’t require the materials for concrete headstones, mahogany caskets or the chemicals used in embalming.

State lawmakers are considering a bill that would legalize water cremation. In the last decade, two previous efforts have failed, although the process has been approved in 14 other states, including neighboring Nevada. This year, a third attempt is gaining momentum in California, progressing further in the Legislature than the previous bills.

Not an Acid Bath 

Of course, acid would ruin the meat and render it useless for the WAFFERS! Speaking of “waffers”, is that not what Catholics use in their Cannibalistic ritual?

There’s only one place in California where bodies are currently dissolved — legally, at least. That would be a chilly basement lab at UCLA, where cadavers that have outlived their usefulness at the medical school end up. The room smells a little like shellfish, which I think might be the smell of melted flesh. But the guy in charge, Dean Fisher, laughs at that notion. […]

Some of the metal in these parts can be recycled, and everything left over is sterile. Nothing organic survives during a water cremation. No bacteria — not even a strand of DNA.

The bones will be pulverized into a white powder that can be placed in an urn, just like the ashes in a traditional cremation.

 

Read the rest about these sick deranged fools here.